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Top 5 Items: Hunter IFAK

Last week we talked about the 3 types of injuries you might face while hunting.

Being far away from medical help is the biggest reason why an emergency in a remote location is especially dangerous. Even a small injury can hold you back enough to turn a normal day into a life-threatening situation.

I’ve spent a lot of time living in arduous conditions and over time I’ve come to value some philosophies when it comes to gear.

Philosophy # 1

Lighter is better.

Anyone experienced in rough living has probably heard the term (or something similar), “Ounces = Pounds. Pounds = Pain.”

Hiking 5 miles into dark timber to shoot an elk then hiking out 250 lbs. of meat over several trips back and forth, and you start looking for ways to reduce your load.

Experienced back packers are always looking to cut their base weight at every available opportunity, throwing away any unnecessary food packaging or cutting toothbrushes in half so they don’t have to carry the extra weight of a full handle.

One popular way to cut weight and reduce misery on the trail is to carry items that can be used for multiple purposes.

  1. Tourniquet

Proper bleeding control is still the most important consideration in any traumatic event. Especially in a remote location where it could take hours to extricate after an emergency. Many people prefer the Combat Application Tourniquet because it’s widely trusted by professionals and is simple to apply one handed.

My preferred TQ for austere environments, however, is the SWAT-T because of its ability to treat injuries other than those on extremities. It’s also light weight and packs well, making it ideal for the back country.

Not only will it work as effective tourniquet, but it’s also a multi-use item that can be converted into a pressure dressing, a chest seal, sling, splinting, hunting rabbits, or whatever else you can think of. This helps to drastically reduce the weight of your trauma kit so you can go farther and longer.

2. QuikClot Gauze

Used along with the SWAT-T as your pressure dressing, a roll of QuikClot gauze can be packed into the wound to control severe bleeding. This is especially important for junction wounds like in your neck, groin, or armpit, where a TQ won’t work.

3. Tape

A multi-use item that can be used for everything you can imagine. I’m sure I don’t need to say, most people can see the value of tape when you need it, but in a wilderness survival situation, it might literally save your life.

This is a handy item for taping down chest seals, securing splints, makeshift bandages and any of the thousands of things you will need tape for.

4. Survival Blanket

Prevention of hypothermia is always a constant concern when dealing with trauma casualties no matter what climate or local you’re hunting in. It’s important to have a way to keep the victim warm while help trudges their way up the mountain.

Survival blankets are inexpensive, lightweight, small enough to pack anywhere, and could literally mean the difference between life and death in the wild.

5. First Aid

Not every injury you get while hunting is going to be a showstopper. Most injuries are going to come from minor scrapes, nicks, cuts, and bruises.

The most used item in any medical kit is the bandaids, and minor wound care products. Keeping a stock in your personal kit and at your base camp will help keep your quality of life up and your happiness at a maximum.

Other items, like ibuprofen, and acetaminophen for stiff muscles, and sports wraps for sore joints help after long days and nights hauling the kill back to camp.

If you want to know how to use these items, check out Emergency Trauma Response. 100% online, free and will help you get started with understanding the basics.

Emergency Trauma Response Training Course

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Teaching Emergency Trauma at the Active Self Protection Conference!

Ok, I get it. Firearm training is a lot sexier than medical training. But to be a good defender, prepared for emergencies both natural and man-made, means having an acceptable collection of skills and knowledge.

I’m a firm believer in the idea that if you’re going to carry the tools to make holes, (defensive weapons) you need the tools to patch holes (trauma gear). This conference is your chance to get trained in both, from excellent, world class instructors with real life experience.

Continue reading Teaching Emergency Trauma at the Active Self Protection Conference!

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Time To Talk: Tactical Tampons

 

It seems to me that most rumors, if left uninvestigated for too long after being conceived, tend to die long slow, and painful deaths.

One of my favorite topics on this blog is investigating emergency trauma myths and whether they’re worth holding on to.

Some rumors (such as extremity elevation above the level of the heart to reduce bleeding) are actually found to be effective after being studied by health care researchers.

But most rumors (like, “your limb will amputated if a TQ is used”) are false, dangerous, and have killed many people over the years.

In this article we’ll be discussing why Tampons are a

 

terrible choice to stock in your trauma kit, and some items that will work much better for saving your own life, or the life of a loved one.

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Primary & Secondary Training Summit 2020

Primary & Secondary Training Summit 2020

At some point you outgrow those basic weapons classes at your local gun range and require more advanced instruction from world class shooters and Warfighters.

One of things I am most proud of America for, is the warrior subculture. This unique little niche is full of military veterans and active duty, but also civilians from all walks of life.

There are many gun owners in the world, but few “Students of the Gun.” Many assume that to be one means you must have some sort of credentials or you aren’t legitimate, but some of the most accomplished shooters I know are civilians who never once put on the boots.

I’ve known just as many veterans boasting incredible shooting skills who don’t even know where the safety is on that shiny new rifle they bought.

Continue reading Primary & Secondary Training Summit 2020